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Creating a prototype

LRT Maintenance Rainwater Reuse by David Thorp created in SketchBook MotionIn the scene, LRT Maintenance Rainwater Reuse, the artist, David Thorp, used SketchBook Motion to illustrate his idea for a prototype.

How this prototype was created

This article breaks down the process for creating this prototype. However, there are some areas we either glossed over or didn’t include. They were either similar to other sections or easy enough for you to figure out on your own. Try to apply the principles used in this example to your own work.

1. Create the following content either in SketchBook or SketchBook Motion:

2. Import any content from outside SketchBook Motion using Import icon in SketchBook Motion > Import to Layer icon in SketchBook Motion Import to Layer.

If any image other than the main image has a solid background, use the built-in option to let the app try to clear its solid background. This will make less work for you and create a transparent background.

3. Now, you animated the following:

Rain

Rain section of a project created in SketchBook Motion

1. Select the rain layer, assign the Particle animation, and draw a line for where the rain starts falling.

Rain layer in SketchBook Motion

2. Before setting the speed of the rain or opacity, create masks to block the rain from the building (beige dotted lines).

3. In Controls, set how fast the rain will fall and emission rates (density of the drops).

Controls in SketchBook Motion

4. Then, select Advanced Controls and make changes to the size of the drops and opacity of the rain (when they disappear).

Scale in the Advanced Controls of SketchBook MotionOpacity in the Advanced Controls of SketchBook Motion

5. In Granular, if you want, you can add a bit of wobble to the drops by playing with their path, speed, and synchronization.

Arrows

Since there are multiple arrows, you’ll need to do this for each one.

Arrow example in SketchBook Motion

1. For each arrow, select its layer, assign the Beeline animation, and draw a line for the arrow to follow.

Arrow layer in SketchBook Motion

2. In Controls, set how fast you want the arrow to travel along the path.

3. Then, select Advanced Controls and make changes to the size of the arrow, so it disappears at a certain point.

Scale controls in SketchBook Motion

Bubbles

Since there are two bubble areas, you’ll need to do this for both layers.

Prototype: Bubble example in SketchBook Motion

1. Select the bubbles layer, assign the Particle animation, and draw a line where the bubbles should starts rising.

Bubble layer in SketchBook Motion

If the bubbles are going the wrong direction, tap Particle manipulator in SketchBook Motion to change it.

2. In Controls, set how fast the bubbles travel and emission rates (the density of the bubbles).

3. Then, select Advanced Controls and change the scale and opacity of the rain to make the bubbles invisible.

Scale controls for bubbles in SketchBook MotionOpacity for bubbles in SketchBook Motion

Rainwater Reuse

This effect uses three layers. The rain layer, we’ll skip over, as it’s similar to the rain section above. The rollers on either side of the subway car are interesting, so we will look at them. Since there’s a set of rollers, you’ll need to do this for both layers.

From Tutorials: Rainwater reuse section of a project created in SketchBook Motion

1. Select the rollers layer and assign the Grow animation.

Rainwater layer in SketchBook Motion

2. Tap Duplicate, then draw a path for the content to be duplicated along (orange dotted line).

3. In Controls, set the speed of the rollers and the spacing to create the rollers.

4. Tap Bend, then draw a path slightly offset from your “duplicate path” (red dotted line).

5. In Granular, use path to add a bit of side-to-side motion to the rollers. You might want to play with the speed of the path.

Path set in SketchBook Motion

Updated on October 13, 2017

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